And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

fpoAnd Then There Were None. Finished 10-14-15, rating 5/5, mystery, pub. 1939

Unabridged Playaway read by Dan Stevens. 6 Hours.

First, there were ten – a curious assortment of strangers summoned as weekend guests to a private island off the coast of Devon. Their host, an eccentric millionaire unknown to all of them, is nowhere to be found. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they’re unwilling to reveal – and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. One by one they fall prey. Before the weekend is out, there will be none. And only the dead are above suspicion.   from Goodreads

“Ten little Indian boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were nine.
Nine little Indian boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were eight.
Eight little Indian boys travelling in Devon; One said he’d stay there and then there were seven.
Seven little Indian boys chopping up sticks; One chopped himself in halves and then there were six.
Six little Indian boys playing with a hive; A bumblebee stung one and then there were five.
Five little Indian boys going in for law; One got in Chancery and then there were four.
Four little Indian boys going out to sea; A red herring swallowed one and then there were three.
Three little Indian boys walking in the Zoo; A big bear hugged one and then there were two.
Two little Indian boys sitting in the sun; One got frizzled up and then there was one.
One little Indian boy left all alone; He went and hanged himself and then there were none.”

Eight strangers and a married couple on a deserted, cut-off island don’t even have time to get to know each other before they start to die one by one in creative ways similar to the rhyme.  It’s a slight book so at first ten seems like a lot of characters to tell apart, but since the numbers start to dwindle early on it isn’t much of  problem to know who’s who.  Just when you have a suspect in mind, it becomes an impossibility due to death or alibi and that’s what makes this a fabulous read.  There is a reason that this is the bestselling mystery of all time and not to be missed.  I don’t want to reveal too much because I do think that it’s best to go in with only that information so you can see how it all sorts itself out.

I think any lover of mysteries, Christie or the board game Clue should read this if they haven’t already.

I read this for my Classics Club Challenge.  My goal is to read these 50 classics by January 1020.  This is number six 🙂  Which one should I read next?

12 thoughts on “And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

  1. Word Lily says:

    There are so many on your list that I love! Do you want a short one? Or a light one? A WWII one? A Southern one?

    I love:
    The Color Purple
    The Prince
    Three Men in a Boat
    Night
    Gone with the Wind
    1984
    The Two Towers (although I hope you’ve already read the first one? middle book of a story …)
    The Diary of a Young Girl

  2. lakesidemusing says:

    I loved this book, too, but think I would have loved it even more listening to Dan Stevens!!

    The audio version of The Color Purple is excellent . Same for Revolutionary Road…I just love Richard Yates. Washington Square is very accessible for Henry James and a good story. The Bluest Eye is great, too.

  3. Kay says:

    Wasn’t this good with Dan Stevens voice in your ear? I loved it and I’ve read it several times. Plus I’ve seen at least 2 or maybe 3 TV/movie adaptations. I will say that sometimes those have a different ending. 😉

    Agatha Christie is a big favorite of mine. As I’m sure you know. I have several of her books that I’ve read many times. Such comfort reads – along with murder. LOL

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