The Art of Friendship: 70 Simple Rules for Making Meaningful Connections by Roger Horchow & Sally Horchow

Title: Art of Friendship: 70 Simple Rules for Making Meaningful Connections, Author: Roger HorchowThe Art of Friendship. Finished 4-28-18, rating 3/5, self-help?, 144 pages, pub. 2005

Seventy brief essays present simple but effective “rules of connecting” with action points to help you put each rule into practice in daily life. Woven throughout are personal anecdotes from the Horchows, sharing their experiences of friendship.
Recognizing that friendships take many forms, the authors offer practical, proven advice that demystifies the process of making friends.
The rules include:
How to create rapport– even in a crowd
How to transform an acquaintance into a friend
When to e-mail, pick up the phone, send a note, or meet in person
How to maintain long-term friendships –and even when it’s time to quit
The book opens with a foreword by Malcolm Gladwell (author of The Tipping Point) that explores the Horchows’ special talent for making and keeping friends. Whether your goal is to start a new relationship or reinvest in a longstanding friendship, this inspiring book will reveal how you can build more meaningful connections in your life.  from Goodreads
I don’t remember bringing this book home, but I wasn’t surprised to find it on my shelves.  It’s the perfect little hardcover size with nice paper and bite sized suggestions for how to make meaningful friendships.  It was written by a father/daughter team and there was quite a bit of name dropping.  This isn’t necessarily bad, it did add extra interest for sure, so I was okay with it.  Were there a few nice ideas and encouragements?  Yes. Was there anything profound? No.  But no matter how many friends in your circle it’s always nice to think about adding to it or deepening existing friendships.

 

4 thoughts on “The Art of Friendship: 70 Simple Rules for Making Meaningful Connections by Roger Horchow & Sally Horchow

  1. Lloyd Russell says:

    Family is often a given. But friendship requires effort and thoughtfulness. Between my wife and me, we have one sibling. And he’s been estranged from the family for over 35 years. Our friends are our family.

    • stacybuckeye says:

      Jason and I have to no siblings between us. so we’re in a similar spot. I love my extended family but they are not local. It’s nice that my parents moved here 4 years ago even though we don’t spend a ton of time with them. Friends are the best, but take time to nourish 🙂

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